One of my favorite African proverbs states, “A little hope each day can fill the rivers to overflowing.” As I’ve expressed in previous updates, hope, for me at least, has been an affirming pillar in my navigating through these uncertain and challenging times. While there may be days when it has been difficult to find, I do. Each day, I seek and find hope, and hope shined bright for the conservation community last week.

Just last week, we saw THREE major pipelines cancel their plans to build hundreds of miles of gas pipelines that could have potentially impacted South Carolina – particularly the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. Southern Environmental Law Center attorney, Greg Buppert, said in a recent Post and Courier article that he “did not expect on a Sunday afternoon to learn that the Atlantic Coast Pipeline was cancelled.” I believe it is safe to say that we all agree with Greg Buppert. The news definitely was an environmental gift, and its cancellation is attributed to and is a direct result of years of work from community activists and environmental groups. Kudos to all involved. It takes authentic activism to bring on change, and because of the determination and consistent efforts of communities most impacted, positive change arrived at our doorsteps last week.

Watch Uniontown with CVSC and Representative Brawley – Thursday at 5:30
Conservation Voters of SC is pleased to announce the first installment of our Short Film Series focusing on the harmful impacts of climate change and environmental pollution on low-income and minority communities. Join us on Thursday, July 16th at 5:30pm to watch the short documentary film “Uniontown,” followed by a discussion with the CSVC team and special guest, Representative Wendy Brawley. Stay tuned for information about our next short film, “Cooked: Survival by Zipcode,” which illustrates the links between extreme weather, extreme inequality, and extreme racism. The film poses the question: what if a zip code was just a routing number and not a life-or-death sentence?

Tele-Town Hall with Congressman Joe Cunningham – Thursday at 4:30
As South Carolina and the nation look at how to best recover from the economic conditions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we have a unique opportunity to rebuild our state and nation stronger and more resilient than before. On Thursday, July 16 from 4:30-5:00pm, join Conservation Voters of South Carolina and Congressman Joe Cunningham for a Tele-Town Hall discussion on the role of clean energy in COVID-19 recovery efforts.

The Congressman and CVSC will discuss opportunities to grow clean energy jobs and investments in South Carolina as part of COVID-19 recovery efforts, creating a cleaner, healthier, and more resilient economy. There will be opportunities for tele-townhall participants to ask the Congressman questions as well as discussions of ways that conservation voters, like you, can get engaged to ensure that we empower the rapidly-growing clean energy industry to rebuild a better Palmetto State.

RSVP here for the Tele-Town Hall. We’ll send you connection info the day of the event.

Public Concern Podcast Returns
The South Carolina Conservation Coalition Podcast, Public Concern, is back! In its latest show, Pipeline and Peaches, CVSC’s Rebecca Haynes and Coastal Conservation League’s Alan Hancock talk about the big news on the Atlantic Coast Pipeline. They also talk with Anthony Mirisciotta from GrowFood Carolina about local food and land conservation. Click here to listen to their fantastic discussion and to subscribe to the podcast.

I’m excited to be joining them this week as we discuss the short film, Uniontown, and the impact of Sierra Club’s lawsuit over DHEC’s permitting of three coal plants in South Carolina. Read more about the lawsuit here.

Hope: It’s an Action Word
Merriam-Webster defines hope as “to desire with expectation of obtainment or fulfillment.” I believe that hope is so powerful that it not only inspires people from around the globe and in every known language, it literally saves lives by pulling people out of difficult and extremely tough situations. So, as we try to reimagine or embrace exactly what hope really means, especially during these times, may we truly begin to expect its fulfillment.

Thank you for all that you do for the conservation movement. Your voice is most important as we seek to ensure a clean, healthy, and safe South Carolina for all.

TAKE ACTION TODAY!